Altoids

Products

Q:

Are Altoids® tins recyclable?

A:

The tins we use for ALTOIDS® are made from tin plate, which is one of the most recyclable materials used in the manufacturing of packaged goods. The good news about these tins is that they also come in handy as small storage containers for things like nails, coins, paper clips, and buttons to name a few - the possibilities are endless. We've even learned that the tins have been used for more curious purposes - as hand-held works of art, even as an emergency wilderness stove.


Q:

What is the nutritional information for Altoids® Smalls?

A:

Serving Size: 1 mint (0.2g)
Calories: 0.5
Total Fat: 0g
Sodium: 0mg
Total Carbohydrate: 0g
Sugars: 0g
Protein: 0g

Keep in mind that ingredients and formulations change, so nutrition information may also change. For the most accurate information please check your pack.


Q:

What is the nutritional information for Altoids® Peppermint, Spearmint, Cinnamon and Wintergreen flavors?

A:

Serving Size: 3 mints (2g)
Calories: 10
Total Fat: 0g
Cholesterol: 0mg
Sodium: 0mg
Total Carbohydrate: 2g
Sugars: 2g
Protein: 0g

Keep in mind that ingredients and formulations change, so nutrition information may also change. For the most accurate information please check your pack.


Q:

How long should I store my Altoids® products?

A:

Altoids® mints have a shelf life of 18 months whereas all other Altoids® products have a shelf life of 12 months.


Where to Buy

Q:

How do I find ALTOIDS® products?

A:

Altoids® are sold at a variety of retailers and should be available in your area. Should you have trouble finding your favorite Altoids® product or flavor please reach out to us at 1-800-974-4539 and we can search for them in your area. Alternatively, you can buy Altoids® products online at http://shop.altoids.com.


Q:

Are Altoids® sold in other countries?

A:

Altoids® are sold in countries outside of the US including Canada, Germany, Latin America, South America, South Korea and the UK.


Q:

Where can I find Altoids® in Canada?

A:

In Canada, we would recommend that you look for Altoids® at all Grabbajabba and 7-11 locations. If you have trouble finding them in local stores, we would like to recommend that you consider looking online for a retailer that will sell and ship Altoids® to Canada.


Q:

Why can't I find my favorite Altoids® product?

A:

We always want to offer our consumers the best variety of brands and flavors. Unfortunately, we have to occasionally discontinue products if they are not selling well enough to continue production. We listen to all consumer comments and are always happy to tell our internal teams when a product is being missed. Alternatively, you can buy other Altoids® products online at http://shop.altoids.com.


Facts & History

Q:

When were Altoids® invented?

A:

Around the turn of the 19th century, during the reign of King George III, the recipe for Altoids® was perfected by Smith & Company, a London confectionary firm. Altoids® were then promoted for over a century as a "stomach calmative".


Q:

Why are they called Altoids®?

A:

The exact origin of the name is unclear, but it seems that during the 19th Century confections were given names employing the -oids suffix to imply a medicinal benefit (of course Altoids® provides no medicinal benefit). Smith & Company also marketed several other remedies with -oids in their names, such as Benoids for delicate throats and chests, Zenoids for an easy digestion , Cyphoids to defend your throat, and Notoids antiseptic voice and throat pastilles.


Q:

When were Altoids® first sold in the United States?

A:

Altoids® were first introduced into the U.S. in 1918.


Q:

Do Altoids® cure bad breath?

A:

No breath mint can "cure" bad breath; they freshen breath. Although curiously strong Altoids® are effective breath fresheners, Altoids® are much more than breath mints. Actors are also known to use Altoids® before shooting romantic scenes.


Q:

Is there a story behind the Altoids® tin?

A:

For over 100 years, Altoids® were packaged in small rectangular cardboard cartons that were approximately the same size as today's recognizable tins. The tins were introduced in the 1920s to help protect the mints and to stay neatly closed in pockets and handbags.